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Elevator AUDIT

Elevators are comprised of multiple features that must be considered for full accessibility. Use this AUDIT to determine how successful your elevators are at providing access and usability for all students, staff and faculty.

R2D2 Center at UW-Milwaukee

Elevator AUDIT  (Excel Document)

Elevator AUDIT Version 1-2 Manual  (PDF File)

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There are 11 comments on this entry.

Posted by: Karthikeyan Sadhasivam on Tue Oct 11, 2011 at 3:47 p.m.

The elevator audit provides a perfect way for universal design. Since it covers all universal design features into it. Everything including dimensions and tactile buttons for different floors provide a universal design feature.

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Posted by: kimberly on Fri Nov 16, 2012 at 2:19 p.m.

This audit was very clear and easy to read. It looked at the accessibility of the elevator holistically and articulated the features of universal design.

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Posted by: caurit on Thu Nov 07, 2013 at 4:04 p.m.

The checklist is easy to use and straight forward; anyone could print it out and begin to assess the environments that they encounter.

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Posted by: nielse45 on Sat Dec 18, 2021 at 12:54 p.m.

The elevator evaluation tool is great overall and is compatible with both MAC and Windows. The instructions are easy to follow and are provided in the manual. This tool gives a detailed evaluation of the accessibility and usability of elevators. Assessing areas such as the position or presence of visual cues, audible alerts, and the design of buttons. Lastly, it helps provide an explanation of elevators in terms of their universal design and provides a throughout the interpretation of the results.

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Posted by: jamievacek on Sat Dec 18, 2021 at 12:56 p.m.

The elevator audit was very precise and included every aspect that needs to be available to make an elevator accessible to the majority of people. When filling out the audit it was very simple to do and easily understandable.

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Posted by: cptaszek22 on Sun Dec 19, 2021 at 7:12 p.m.

The elevator audit has included features of universal design in order to make elevators accessible to all. It covers the elevator lobby and car. It accesses visual, auditory, and tactile cues of the buttons and movement of the elevator. There's also detailed instructions for how to complete and score the elevator based off this audit.

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Posted by: mariamedlicott on Mon Dec 20, 2021 at 12:26 p.m.

The elevator audit was clear and easy to follow. It did a great job of covering all aspects of the elevator and making sure it is accessible for everyone. Most people think of the physical barriers and aspects that need to be accessible, but this audit included the sensory, cognitive tactile and physical aspects that are important to keep in mind. Scores were easy to get after filling out each question.

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Posted by: esnyder5 on Mon Dec 20, 2021 at 12:26 p.m.

Having this AUDIT is an excellent example on promoting universal design to ensure elevators are accessible to all users. The AUDIT is written in a simple, easy to understand language and covers multiple areas, such as elevator button and sensory feedback within the elevator. Overall, I found this AUDIT very helpful when examining the accessibility of elevators.

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Posted by: saragon on Tue Dec 21, 2021 at 11:55 a.m.

The elevator AUDIT was very helpful and easy to understand. I appreciated the printable option of the AUDIT as not all elevators allow for internet access which could affect one's ability to complete the assessment. Additionally, I appreciated that simple, understandable language was used and considered visual, tactile, cognitive, and physical elements. Alternative options were provided for measurement (such as force in grams) eliminating the need for costly tools. Some visuals would help with clarity but overall I thought it was well designed.

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Posted by: RMaz on Tue Dec 21, 2021 at 11:55 a.m.

I think this AUDIT it very thorough with respect to information access and button usability. I specifically liked how it mentioned indicators of departure direction and gave criteria for button curvature. However, I was surprised that this AUDIT did not consider the levelness of the floor during transition into the elevator or guidance for placement of rails inside the elevator itself.

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Posted by: dbrose on Wed Dec 22, 2021 at 11:27 a.m.

The elevator AUDIT was very easy to read and understand and provided a very good approach to ensuring elevators are universally designed. I really liked how this AUDIT discussed visual and cognitive elements that are important when determining the accessibility of an elevator and not just focusing on the physical elements. Many components of the elevator were included in this AUDIT and overall I thought it was a really helpful tool.

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It took me several years of struggling with the heavy door to my building, sometimes having to wait until a person stronger came along, to realize that the door was an accessibility problem, not only for me, but for others as well. And I did not notice, until one of my students pointed it out, that the lack of signs that could be read from a distance at my university forced people with mobility impairments to expend a lot of energy unnecessarily, searching for rooms and offices. Although I have encountered this difficulty myself on days when walking was exhausting to me, I interpreted it, automatically, as a problem arising from my illness (as I did with the door), rather than as a problem arising from the built environment having been created for too narrow a range of people and situations.

Susan Wendell, author of
The Rejected Body: Feminist Philosophical Reflections on Disability