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Disclaimer

The ACCESS Main Street website is supported in part by the Wisconsin Department of Health Services, on behalf of the division of Long Term Care, Office of Independence and Employment Pathways Medicaid Infrastructure Grant.  The opinions contained in this publication are those of the grantee and do not necessarily reflect those of the Department of Health Services.

Our tools and resources are provided as drafts and research versions. Ethical and appropriate use of the resources and evaluation instruments found on or linked to from the ACCESS Main Street website are the responsibilities of the user. The ACCESS Main Street Project takes no responsibility for their use.

Please feel free to copy and distribute our resources with two conditions:

  1. Do NOT change the content unless you have received prior approval from the ACCESS Main Street Project.
  2. Reference and cite the ACCESS Main Street Project as your source.

As we continue to improve our resources and tools we also ask for constructive feedback using our Feedback Form. This will assist in our continuing development of our document and products as they are made available to improve the accessibility of the community.

It took me several years of struggling with the heavy door to my building, sometimes having to wait until a person stronger came along, to realize that the door was an accessibility problem, not only for me, but for others as well. And I did not notice, until one of my students pointed it out, that the lack of signs that could be read from a distance at my university forced people with mobility impairments to expend a lot of energy unnecessarily, searching for rooms and offices. Although I have encountered this difficulty myself on days when walking was exhausting to me, I interpreted it, automatically, as a problem arising from my illness (as I did with the door), rather than as a problem arising from the built environment having been created for too narrow a range of people and situations.

Susan Wendell, author of
The Rejected Body: Feminist Philosophical Reflections on Disability