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The Accessible Virtual Community

Shopping

Illustration represents shopping areas.

What else can be done to improve the accessibility of shopping experiences, be it retail, wholesale, large or small scale, products, or services?  One example is how some grocery stores now offer electric carts for people with mobility limitations to use.To search for more related information, you can go to our Search Page.

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ADA Requirements: Service Animals

This website has updated ADA guidelines, regulations, and rights for people with service animals.

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Center for Inclusive Design and Environmental Access

This website contains information on the center for Inclusive Design and Environmental Access (IDEA). The IDEA Center at Buffalo, NY is dedicated to improving the design of environments and products by making them more usable, safer, and appealing to people with a wide range of abilities throughout their life spans. This includes project information, community dissemination activities, publications, sample pictures of universally designed homes, and links.

IDEA at University of Buffalo NY

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Guidelines and Resources for Designing Grocery Check-Stands

This PDF document from CATEA, Center for Assistive Technology & Environmental Access, is an illustrated guide that provides information that can be used to design, develop, test, refine, and evaluate retail grocery checkstands. This guide is meant to maximize independence and participation of people with disabilities in the workplace and includes diagrams with measurements for work spaces.

Center for Assistive Technology & Environmental Access

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Tips for Communicating with People who are Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing

A tip sheet for communicating with individuals who are deaf and hard-of-hearing.

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Universal Design: Product Evaluation Countdown

A free pdf from the Center for Universal Design, North Carolina State University, includes a checklist to help individuals think about their own needs and those of potential users when selecting products. Questions for consideration are based on the 7 Principles of Universal Design.

The Center for Universal Design, North Carolina State University

It took me several years of struggling with the heavy door to my building, sometimes having to wait until a person stronger came along, to realize that the door was an accessibility problem, not only for me, but for others as well. And I did not notice, until one of my students pointed it out, that the lack of signs that could be read from a distance at my university forced people with mobility impairments to expend a lot of energy unnecessarily, searching for rooms and offices. Although I have encountered this difficulty myself on days when walking was exhausting to me, I interpreted it, automatically, as a problem arising from my illness (as I did with the door), rather than as a problem arising from the built environment having been created for too narrow a range of people and situations.

Susan Wendell, author of
The Rejected Body: Feminist Philosophical Reflections on Disability